Term 2, 2009

Civil Rights

Human Rights worksheets

Well done 8A, you have made some fantastic worksheets in a very short time

  1. afghan women_lily_alys_keila1.doc
  2. China_harry_andrew_jack_pavel.doc
  3. Gay Rights_pepa_amy.doc

amnesty.jpg

Lesson 22/06/09: Pick your cause

Activity: You are a member of Amnesty International and you have been asked to create a worksheet for Amnesty’s new education website. Each worksheet is aimed at different year levels, you are writing for Year 7 / Year 8 level. You may work in teams of two or three, it is recommended that you work in Google Docs. Below are nine current Human/Civil Rights issues in different parts of the world. Pick one of these issues to research: refugee.jpg

A current
Human/Civil Rights
issue of your
own choosing

Burma:
The plight of
Aung San Suu Kyi

India:
Child Labour

Australia:
Treatment of
refugees

Australia: Gay Rights,
the right to marry, to adopt,
to be treated as equal

Australia:
Indigenous rights
(Close the gap)

China:
The Great Fire
Wall of China

Afghanistan:
Women’s rights
under the Taliban

China:
One Child Policy


Each sheet should contain the following:gay.jpg
  • A brief overview of the Human Rights / Civil Rights issue (about 200 – 250 words), explaining in simple, clear language what the issue is.
  • A small map of where in the world this Human Rights issue is occurring.
  • The worksheet should be made in Word (unless you chose PowerPoint, Wiki or Poster). Make sure it looks attractive, interesting and inviting.
  • The sheet should contain an activity so that the students can test their understanding. You may choose one or two activities from the rubric below:

Create a word search puzzle
with a hidden message

Create a multiple choice quiz
about the topic

Create a crossword puzzle
Create a stand-alone PowerPoint,
incorporating your 200 words plus
images

Create a cloze
(=missing words) of your text
or... a true or false.

Create open questions
which invite empathy,
discussion or more research.

Create a stand-alone poster,
incorporating your 200 words plus images,
maps, illustrations and drawings

Create a stand-alone Wiki,
incorporating your 200 words,
links and images.

Create an action plan to collect
money, signatures,
raise awareness,
start a campaign etc.

You have today's lesson (75 minutes) and tomorrow's lesson (50 minutes) to work on this in class.IndiaChildLabourProtest_enhance.jpg
It will then be homework for Thursday the 25th to finish the worksheet off.
On Thursday the 25th your group should have 25 printed copies of the worksheet to hand out. Your worksheet will also be upload to this Wiki.
Everyone will be completing each other's worksheet in that lesson.
In class we will vote for the best worksheet according to these criteria:
Crosswrd.jpg
  1. Clarity of explanation
  2. Quality of the activity/activities
  3. Attractiveness of the worksheet

Useful links:
http://puzzlemaker.discoveryeducation.com/
http://www.amnesty.org/




Lesson 11/06/09

CSI (Colour, Symbol, Image) activity.
Read the article and then listen to the audio file on this website: http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=4738649
Download the CSI template: CSI.doc
It is homework if you don't finish it in class.



Civil Rights Videos

Quick 2 min overview of Civil Rights movement:



Excerpt of MLK's speech, subtitled


United_States_Slavery_Map_1860.jpg
Map of location of slaves in 1860

Video: KKK, Then and Now




Homework 22/04/09

  1. Complete the Slavery Task: Slavery task.doc
  2. Do this online word matching puzzle. Complete it at least 3 times because the words will change slightly each time you do it:
    http://www.quia.com/mc/1472887.html?AP_rand=1526242910
  3. Complete the Crossword puzzle: Civil rights crossword.doc

The computer puzzle does not take up much time. After that you do the crossword.
You can look up the words in the glossary provided
Why do you have to do these puzzles? Because it is important to know all the right words to talk about the civil rights movement. The words in these puzzles will give you the ability to use the correct terminology.

Obama's Victory Speechobama.jpg

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/americas/us_elections_2008/7710038.stm
On the 4th of November, 2008, Barack Obama delivered his acceptance speech to become the 44th president of the United States, and the first black man to hold this office. His speech was full of historical references.

Your task (Yes, you can!):

Below is an excerpt of Obama's acceptance speech. Seven words or parts of sentences have been underlined.
You are going to use the internet to find the historical meaning of the seven underlined passages.
Write at least four sentences explaining what event Obama is referring to.
You may do it on the computer but you need to print it off and stick it in your workbook. Alternatively, hand write it in your workbook.
This task will be part of your workbook mark

You can listen to this particluar fragment by clicking here:




"This election had many firsts and many stories that will be told for generations. But one that's on my mind tonight is about a woman who cast her ballot in Atlanta. She's a lot like the millions of others who stood in line to make their voice heard in this election except for one thing - Ann Nixon Cooper is 106 years old.
She was born just a generation past slavery; a time when there were no cars on the road or planes in the sky; when someone like her couldn't vote for two reasons - because she was a woman and because of the colour of her skin.
And tonight, I think about all that she's seen throughout her century in America - the heartache and the hope; the struggle and the progress;
the times we were told that we can't, and the people who pressed on with that American creed: Yes, we can.
At a time when women's voices were silenced and their hopes dismissed, she lived to see them stand up and speak out and reach for the ballot. Yes, we can.

When there was despair in the dust bowl and depression across the land,
she saw a nation conquer fear itself with a New Deal, new jobs and a new sense of common purpose. Yes, we can.
When the bombs fell on our harbour and tyranny threatened the world, she was there to witness a generation rise to greatness and a democracy was saved. Yes, we can.
She was there for the buses in Montgomery, the hoses in Birmingham, a bridge in Selma,
and a preacher from Atlanta who told a people that "we shall overcome".
Yes, we can.

A man touched down on the Moon, a wall came down in Berlin, a world was connected by our own science and imagination.
And this year, in this election, she touched her finger to a screen, and cast her vote, because after 106 years in America,
through the best of times and the darkest of hours, she knows how America can change.
Yes, we can."




wehaveovercome.jpg

Photo from The Age, 06/11/08.
What is the significance of this sign?
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